How to Hold a Golf Club-Know the Techniques & Tips

How to Hold a Golf Club

It seems so simple, but many golfers want to know how to hold a golf club the proper way. While it’s true that anyone can grip and hold the club, there are certain grips that give you the control and comfort needed to play well.

There are several grips, and each serve a different purpose. Here we’ll go over the basic grip, how to use different and more advanced grips and overall tips for how to improve your golf grip. This is the key to getting the best score because you’ll have much better control over your swing.

Content:

⇒Basic Grip
1. What is the Basic Grip?
2. Initial Placement
3. Placing the Club
4. Securing the Non-Dominant Hand
5. Secure the Dominant Hand
⇒Baseball Grip (AKA: 10-Finger Grip)
1. Explanation
2. Grip Position
3. Pros
4. Cons
5. Proper Form
⇒Vardon Grip
1. Explanation
2. Grip Position
3. Pros
4. Cons
5. Proper Form
⇒Interlocking Grip
1. Explanation
2. Grip Position
3.Pros
4.Cons
5. Proper Form
⇒Grip Tips
1. Change Grip Strength
2. Weak Grip Vs. Strong Grip
3. Putting Position
4. Fingers Over Palms
5. Forearm Tension
⇒Conclusion

Basic Grip

1. What is the Basic Grip?

This is the most basic grip and the series of instructions and movements you will go through every time that you go to grip your golf club. Regardless of which advanced grip you choose or how seasoned a golfer you become, these are the basic instructions that you will follow.

This section will go over how to place your hands, where to put them and other important aspects to mastering the grip. Be sure to follow the instructions exactly for the best results. Any deviation can lead to a low score or other problems with your game.

2. Initial Placement

Place your dominant hand on the golf club around where the shaft connects with the grip, or where the metal meets the rubber. Lift the club to a 45-degree angle and hold it there. This is not where your dominant hand will stay, but this is an initial step that helps you place your non-dominant hand and then move your dominant hand to the correct spot.

Your dominant hand depends on whether you are right-handed or left-handed. If right-handed, then you’ll be placing your right hand and vice versa.

3. Placing the Club

This step involves your non-dominant hand, so your left hand if you are right-handed. Keep the non-dominant hand relaxed and open as you bring it over to the golf club. Place the grip across the inside of your hand, specifically where your index finger knuckles meet the palm.

The end of the club should extend just somewhat further than the joint on your pinkie. There is a bit of leeway here, but not much. Make sure that the club extends past your hand for the best grip.

If your non-dominant hand isn’t placed properly, then all sorts of problems can occur with your stroke. From low power to bad accuracy and even very loose grip, this can destroy your game. It all starts here, so make sure that you place your hand carefully in the right spot.

4. Securing the Non-Dominant Hand

Here’s where you close the non-dominant hand and wrap it around the club. Start by curling your bottom three fingers (middle, ring and pinkie) around the club. Next, set your thumb across the top of the grip. Keep going and roll the thumb over the grip towards the opposite side. Curl your index finger around the club.

If this is correct, then you’ll be able to just barely see the knuckles on your middle and index fingers. You should be able to feel every part of the club’s underside with your three bottom fingers. The base of your thumb should be on the grip and not laying over your index finger.

5. Secure the Dominant Hand

Curl the fingers of your dominant around the grip just like with the other hand. The pinkie will fit between the space of your index and middle finger on the non-dominant hand. The interaction of these fingers will change based on the other grips described below, so this may change.

Imagine a clock face and visualize your club head is 12 o’clock. Lay the thumb of your dominant hand flat on the club’s grip and point it towards 11 o’clock. That’s all there is to it, now you know how to hold a golf club.

Let’s move on to more advanced grips that will help elevate your game to a new level. These grips require some hand movements ranging from slight to significant, but you’ll have no problem finding the right one for you.

Baseball Grip (AKA: 10-Finger Grip)

1. Explanation

This is the easiest of the advanced grips and is used most common by newer golfers, those with smaller hands and players who experience arthritis. Your fingers do not interlock, which sets this apart from the other two grips where the fingers do interlock.

2. Grip Position

Move your dominant hand down the club until it’s slightly off your non-dominant hand. There should be no space between the fingers of both of your hands. While the hands are not interlocked, they are right next to each other as if you are holding a baseball bat, hence the name.

3. Pros

Aside from being the easiest grip and best for newer players, this grip gives you more leverage than other grips, which can help you hit the ball further and with more power. There’s no learning curve involved. You can use this grip immediately without much practice.

4. Cons

While the 10-finger grip does give you more power, it also reduces your control. That’s why many pros use the other grips. Accuracy is often more important than distance, but not always. Like with any grip, this comes down to preference.

5. Proper Form

When using the baseball grip, be sure to lead with the hips during the downswing and follow through with your hands. This will give you the best results.

Vardon Grip

1. Explanation

This is considered the traditional golf grip and is currently the most common one used by pros and amateur players. If you want to know how to hold a golf club properly, then this is one of the best methods available. There is some modest finger interlocking, but not too much. This makes it easier if you have difficulty moving your fingers.

2. Grip Position

Move your dominant hand down until the hands are touching. Move the pinkie finger on your dominant hand back until it lays between the space of your middle and index fingers on your non-dominant hand. That’s all there is to it. Your hands and fingers are closer than with a baseball grip, but it’s very similar.

3. Pros

This is a recommended grip for players with larger hands and it should be easy on those with arthritis. Gives you a balanced amount of control and power when hitting the ball.

4. Cons

This grip can be difficult for those with smaller hands. Those with smaller hands tend to experience less overall control and their swings tend to be inaccurate with this grip.

5. Proper Form

Since this is a traditional and common form, most strokes are written with the Vardon grip in mind. You shouldn’t have to change your stance at all to make the most of this grip.

Interlocking Grip

1. Explanation

There is significant finger interlocking here as one of the fingers on your dominant hand will interlock with the fingers on your non-dominant hand. This grip does take some time to feel comfortable, but some of the best pros love this grip.

2. Grip Position

Start by opening your index and middle fingers slightly on your non-dominant hand, just enough for there to be a gap between the fingers. Take the pinkie finger on your dominant hand and push it into this space until the fingers and hands are interlocked.

3. Pros

If you want to know how to hold a golf club and you have either medium-sized hands or tend to be a weaker player, then you’ll love this grip. It gives you more power without sacrificing control. This grip also reduces tension and excess movement in the wrists.

4. Cons

This grip can be quite uncomfortable at first and it takes a lot of time to get used to it. However, major players like Tiger Woods use this grip. Give it a try and see if it works for you.

It may not be good if you have arthritis in your fingers as this grip requires a fair amount of finger flexibility. If it hurts, then stop and try another grip.

5. Proper Form

Take a little more time with your swings when you are first using this grip. Since it’s a little uncomfortable at first, you’ll need to slow down your swings to ensure the best power and accuracy. As you get used to it you’ll be able to use your full speed.

Grip Tips

1. Change Grip Strength

Adjusting your grip strength is easy and only requires some slight hand movement. Turn your dominant hand in until your thumbs create a “V” shape. The deeper and wider the “V,” the stronger your grip will become.

While many newer golfers need to strengthen their grip, this isn’t universal. Sometimes a weaker grip works better, which will be covered below.

2. Weak Grip Vs. Strong Grip

Making your grip a little looser can combat some problems that affect golfers, so you’ll want to know how to hold a golf club like this if you have a hook or poor height. A looser grip will often correct these problems, but don’t loosen your grip too much.

On the other hand, a stronger grip is more comfortable and often gives you better overall shots. You’ll also find that your control and accuracy improve as you strengthen your grip.

Don’t be afraid to experiment a little and see which one works best for you. A neutral grip is also an option, where you are situated in the middle and get the best of both worlds.

3. Putting Position

When it’s time for putting your grip position should change slightly for better control, less power and to ensure minimal movement in your wrists. Your wrists should be angled downwards, and the handle should lean against the lifeline in your palm, or parallel to the thumb.

While you can technically use any grip when getting into putting position, the baseball grip tends to be the most popular here. Now just move your arms like a pendulum and you’ll have the perfect putt.

4. Fingers Over Palms

One of the hardest things with learning the proper golf grip is knowing where to hold the club in the hand. It feels natural to hold the club in your palm like a baseball bat or a wrench, but that’s not right here. That will lead to poor control and bad form.

You must remember that proper grip is more in the fingers than the palms. The club grip should be situated near the beginning of your fingers when they separate from the palm.

Placing the club too much in the palm will lead to bad shots, and the club might even fall out of your hand when you are trying to hit the ball. If your fingers aren’t involved, then you’re not holding the club correctly.

5. Forearm Tension

When you’re holding something tightly you’ll notice that your forearms tense. This is natural, but it shouldn’t be happening when you’re holding a golf club. You must loosen up your grip strength, relax the forearms and allow all the pressure to be in your hands.

Many golfers experience forearm tension either when they are first starting out or when the pressure of the game is at its highest and they are straining their whole body. Wiggle the club around, let your forearms relax and return to proper form. This is what will help you win games and perform at your best.

Conclusion

There are few things that seem simpler than learning how to hold a golf club, and the truth is that it is very easy once you get the form down. However, it’s a little more complicated than it initially seems. If you follow these instructions exactly, then you’ll get it in no time.

The proper hold and finger interlocking will help improve your game while also reducing injury, increasing accuracy and allowing you to play at the best of your ability.

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