How to Clean Golf Clubs-Easy & Effective Ways

If you’re looking for how to clean golf clubs then you came to the right place. It seems like such a simple thing, but there are actually multiple ways of going about cleaning your golf clubs. You can use cleaning kits, soap, soda (more on that later) and much more.

Regardless of how you do it, making your golf clubs clean is essential. Not only do dirty clubs look bad (which is terrible with such a social sport), but they also reduce your performance and diminish the longevity of your clubs. Be sure to keep your clubs clean.

Content:

-Household Cleaning DIY
1. Gather Ingredients
2. Making Suds
3. Iron Clubs
4. Use the Brush
5. Rinse and Dry
6. Woods and Hybrids
-Cleaning with Coke
1.Warnings
2. Prepare the Cup
3. Insert the Club
4. Clean the Club
Bonus: Use Vinegar
-Cleaning the Shaft and Grips
1. Shaft Warnings
2. Cloth
3. Use Wax
4. Cleaning the Grip
5. Bristle Brush
6. Sand the Grips
-Use a Cleaning Kit
1. What is a Cleaning Kit?
2. Spray the Cleaner
3. Use the Brush
4. Wipe it Down
4. Conclusion

Household Cleaning DIY

1. Gather Ingredients

This is how you clean your clubs at home with a couple of common household items. First of all, gather the proper ingredients. All you need is a plastic bucket (you can use the sink, but most people won’t want to do that), mild dishwashing soap, either an old toothbrush or another small brush with bristles and a towel for wiping the clubs down when you’re done.

If you don’t have any of these items, then you can obtain them from any store and typically for just a few dollars.

2. Making Suds

Take the bucket and squirt some of the soap into the bucket. You shouldn’t need too much, just a little squirt should be fine. Then, fill the bucket with some warm water. You can either do this at the sink or bathtub, whichever is most convenient. A hose can also be used if you are doing this outside.

You just need enough water to cover the golf club heads. Putting in a little extra is fine, but you rarely have to fill the whole bucket.

3. Iron Clubs

To clean your iron clubs, just place them in the bucket for a few minutes. This includes your wedges as well, but don’t put the putter or drivers in there. Wood and hybrid clubs will come later, you don’t want to soak them in the bucket as that can cause issues.

You just need to leave your clubs in the bucket for a few minutes, about three to five should be fine. This gives the soap enough time to loosen dirt, oils and anything else affixed to the material.

4. Use the Brush

Time to use that brush. Remember, the brush must have soft bristles, wire bristles can damage the material. Just go around the clubhead and all around to remove dirt and grass. Go all the way around until all the debris is gone.

If there is still some stuck on debris or particles, then soak the club for another minute or two and try again.

5. Rinse and Dry

Now you have to rinse off the suds with either a hose or tap water, give it a quickly visual inspection to ensure that everything is cleaned off, and use the towel to dry the clubs.

6. Woods and Hybrids

These are cleaned in a similar fashion, but there is absolutely no soaking time as this can destroy the wood. Just quickly dip the clubhead into the soapy solution and rub them with a moist cloth to remove dirt and debris.

Don’t use a brush, only a cloth. Once everything is clean, use a dry towel to dry the club.

Cleaning with Coke

1.Warnings

Before you start putting all of your clubs in soda, be aware that this should only be used in specific situations with specific clubs. It’s more of a gimmick than anything else, but it is quite effective when used properly.

If you want to clean your golf clubs with coke, then only use raw finish metal clubs. Chrome finishes or any other type of club will be damaged if you try this, so be very careful.

Also, while this can remove dirt and other materials, this is best for rust and other very hard cleaning jobs.

2. Prepare the Cup

You don’t need a whole bucket for this one, just a plastic cup will do (glass is fine, but do you really want to use a glass cup for this?). Get a cup that is large enough to fit your clubhead into and fill it with soda.

You don’t want it to be completely full as some will spill when you submerge the club, but there should be enough where it will cover the entire clubhead.

3. Insert the Club

Insert the club so that only the head is submerged. If any other material is in there, then it might be damaged. Be prepared to keep it in there for a long time, because this takes a full 24 hours to work correctly.

Allow the club to soak and take it out tomorrow.

4. Clean the Club

The soda will leave a sticky residue, so clean the club head with soap and water after removing it from the cup. If all goes well, then the rust and hard sediment will be gone and you’ll be left with a rejuvenated club.

Bonus: Use Vinegar

Don’t want to use soda? Vinegar works almost the same believe it or not, so you can clean your golf clubs with vinegar if you’d like. The acid can eat away at rust, and it works under the same conditions. The only difference is that it’s a little easier to control the acidity levels when using vinegar, so try this method as well.

Cleaning the Shaft and Grips

1. Shaft Warnings

Along with the clubhead, you should also clean the golf club’s shaft and grip. The shaft typically has a polyurethane coating, which can be delicate, but is easy enough to clean.

If you do this right, then the shaft will be just fine. If you use harsh soaps or brushes, then you can damage the club shaft, which can lead to warping or it breaking on the field.

2. Cloth

Use a soft, damp cloth (just water, no soap) and wipe the shaft down. It’s rare for hard dirt to be stuck to the shaft, so this should be easy to do. Just wipe up and down until the shaft is clean.

Once clean, use a dry cloth to wipe it down and remove all the water.

3. Use Wax

This is especially true with graphic shafts. Use either golf-specific wax or a reputable furniture wax. Read the instructions to see how to apply it. Once applied, allow the wax to dry to affix to the shaft.

4. Cleaning the Grip

Cleaning the golf grip is fairly easy and should only be done once a month (or less if you don’t play that often). Start by rinsing the grip with water and then using a little soap to make some suds.

5. Bristle Brush

Use a soft bristle brush to get into the grooves of the handle and remove any dirt lodged in there. Don’t go too hard as this might ruin the texture and finish, but go hard enough to dislodge any particles.

Once finished, rinse off the soap and immediately dry with a towel.

6. Sand the Grips

Sometimes using sandpaper is called for, but only when the grip is getting old and wearing out. If the texture is mostly smooth and worn, then you can use sandpaper to help restore the texture.

Use a medium-grit sandpaper and buff lengthwise, starting at the top and going to the bottom. Rinse when finished and dry with a towel. This should make the grip feel a little better in the hand.

Use a Cleaning Kit

1. What is a Cleaning Kit?

Normally when you look for how to clean golf clubs you’ll find a ton of information about doing it at home, but few people seem to remember that professional cleaning kits are available. These kits give you everything that you need and it takes less time to clean the clubs.

Normally you’ll get a cleaner, brush and a towel, all of which are made specifically for golf clubs.

2. Spray the Cleaner

While each product is different, most of these kits work the same for cleaning your golf clubs. Start by spraying the cleaner on the head and letting it sit there for a minute or two to really work on the debris.

3. Use the Brush

Take the included brush and get into the grooves and remove the dirt. Normally this brush has very small bristles that perfectly fit into the club grooves, so it shouldn’t require too much effort.

4. Wipe it Down

Lastly, take the microfiber cloth and just wipe down the club until it’s dry and clean. These cloths are good for remove moisture, so it should only take a second until your club looks like new again.

Conclusion

Many people want to know how to clean golf clubs and there are various answers to that question. You can use a professional kit, DIY with soap and a bucket or even use soda or vinegar for rust or other difficult cleaning jobs.

In general, this is very easy and should be done regularly to keep your clubs in the best shape possible. Not only that, but it can help improve your performance while keeping you from being the laughing stock on the course with the dirty clubs.

 

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