15 Awesome Golf Tips for Beginners

Golf has long been a source of comedic frustration as you try to hit a small ball with various clubs a long distance. And your score is based on how few times you have to hit it, so one mistake can truly set you back. Improvement in golf too often means I missed a few times less this time than last. We’re going to provide a number of golf tips for beginners to make your game play awesome.

Content:

01. Know What You Need to Know
02. Manage Your Time
03. Anchor Your Foot
04. Practice Makes Perfect
05. Practice Short Shots in Particular
06. Focus on the Center of the Green
07. Have Just the Right Equipment
08. Try Before You Buy
09. Learn How to Warm Up
10. Learn Clubface Control
11. If You Need Lessons, Learn from the Right Teacher
12. Don’t Think the Place You Play Matters
13. Learn How to Read the Green
14. Understand the Impact of Time on Your Game and Performance
15. Analyze Your Stats

01. Know What You Need to Know

Before you start playing golf, take the time to understand the basic rules. You don’t have to understand every nuance, but you need to know the basic rules if you want to avoid major problems when playing with others. Another matter is etiquette. We can laugh at the uber-tacky outfits some golfers wear, but you’ll get yelled at on many golf courses if you wear shoes that tear up the green or accidentally hit someone. If you aren’t that good a shot, yell “fore” so that others know to look out for the ball and, hopefully, avoid being hit by it.

2. Manage Your Time

The golf course is something like an assembly line. Everyone is playing through, though they aren’t all at the same speed. So be mindful of people’s time. Don’t take a bunch of practice swings at every hole – it slows down your group and everyone behind you. While you may want to walk to the next hole, consider hopping in the cart instead of making everyone wait for you.

03. Anchor Your Foot

If you want to send the ball flying as far as possible, you have to anchor your foot and body behind the ball. If you’re right handed, your right foot needs to be kept down as long as possible. Lift it too soon, and you lose power and distance.

04. Practice Makes Perfect

If you’re utterly new to golf, consider lessons. You could practice in a separate area for beginners so that you don’t chop up the green where your friends want to play through. You’ll also be respecting everyone’s time, because they won’t be waiting for you to hit the ball or go hunting for it. Lessons will help you learn how to hit the ball most of the time and in the intended direction.

Go ahead and invite friends to practice on a putting green if you’re truly new to the game. They can give you pointers on your swing while improving their own game with minimal effort. Yes, we’re suggesting you spend time at the driving range before you try to play on the full green.

If you’ve figured out how to hit the ball, use the driving range as the place to practice particular swings. And save your balls by borrowing the driving range’s cheap balls while you hit the heck out of them. Don’t practice late at night either on the driving range or the golf course, because it is hard to see your improvement.

If you’re still learning the basics, you could arrive early at the golf course and practice on their driving range for half an hour to an hour before your tee time. But don’t bother trying to visit the golf course until you can get the golf ball airborne in the general direction of the hole.

05. Practice Short Shots in Particular

A common mistake beginners make is practicing the long drives. Instead, devote as much time to the “short shots”. About half of the average player’s strokes come within 150 feet (50 yards) of the green. This means that half the game is spent in the final 50 yards, and that will require wedges or putters. So yes, you need to practice hitting the ball into the hole from 20 feet away. It may feel like kiddie golf, but it isn’t. This is what could save you time, hassle and strokes when playing on the full golf course.

06. Focus on the Center of the Green

Instead of trying to hit the hole in one, focus on the center of the green. Be happy when it is close, because you can get it the rest of the way in one or two shots. You’ll hit it into the green in regulation more often than if you focus on the pin.

07. Have Just the Right Equipment

We’ll say here that you don’t need the most expensive equipment to get up the learning curve as a new golfer, though too many sales people will push the expensive equipment as the solution to your amateur game. In reality, the solution is practice with decent equipment. And as a beginner, it is probably worth it to buy, borrow or rent golf clubs for beginners.

That said, you will want a variety of golf clubs. Yet you won’t need to lug around the entire set of 14 golf clubs as you travel the course (the maximum most golf courses let you carry). Instead, beginners only need a driver, putter, sand wedge, a six iron, an eight iron, a fairway wood and maybe a pitching wedge. For some, a hybrid club with eighteen to twenty degrees of loft is a good idea. At most, this means you’re carrying eight clubs, not fourteen. By not buying the exotic clubs, you could save money. And by only carrying the clubs you need, you won’t wear yourself out as you try to walk around the course.

A universal golf tip for beginners is to have plenty of golf balls. However, you can get by with used equipment. A side benefit of buying used golf equipment or borrowing it is that you don’t waste a lot of money if you decide you don’t want to keep playing the game. Remember that you can find decent used equipment from people who are retiring or quitting the game because they don’t have the time to play. If you’re in an athletic goods store, you could find major deals in the discounted section or used goods section. And stay away from head covers for your irons. They’re useless.

08. Try Before You Buy

Before you buy the golf clubs, try them out. If they’re too heavy for you or don’t fit your hands, don’t buy them. And don’t listen to the salesperson telling you that you really need the top of the line (and expensive) titanium clubs.

09. Learn How to Warm Up

Golf is a sport, and that isn’t just because you could get a hard workout walking between the holes. The first step in the warm up is stretching to loosen up your joints. Then start hitting balls on the practice range with wedges. Move up to heavier clubs like the middle irons and then the woods. You want to be able to make slow, controlled swings with the heaviest clubs without feeling tired.

10. Learn Clubface Control

A common mistake beginners make is flipping the club at the end of the swing, whether they’re too long on the down swing or open the club too much on the back swing. This makes the ball swing inconsistent. Learn how to square the club at the right point in the swing for a smooth impact.

11. If You Need Lessons, Learn from the Right Teacher

If you need golf lessons, the teacher you choose really shouldn’t be someone you know real well. This means that your spouse probably shouldn’t be your teacher. By adding a new source of conflict, it could hurt your relationship or drive one of you from the game. A good friend may be leading you into the sport, but expecting them to spend hours teaching you all the details could erode the friendship. Let them give you a few pointers. Then, if you need lessons, hire a professional teacher to help you.

You’ll learn faster from a professional teacher who knows how to impart this knowledge as fast as possible. You won’t be trying their patience because you’re paying them for their time. There is no need to be embarrassed because they see mistakes like the ones you’re making all of the time. And they won’t be able to share the funny stories of your bad swings with your friends and family, so there is no reason to be self-conscious.

Another benefit of hiring a teacher is that they will start where you truly need to start, focusing on issues like foot position and stance while a friend may focus on your swing. They’ll help you select equipment that fits your frame and develop good posture.
A side benefit of working with a teacher is that they can tell you what not to do. They’ll demonstrate how not to bend at the knees, stay flat footed through the impact, and other mistakes they know beginners are prone to making.

One of the best golf tips for beginners is to take lessons as early as possible, and go ahead and take lessons to address any shortcomings you identify. You’ll save yourself a lot of frustration and time. No one is going to think less of you as a player if you say you can’t play the course this Saturday because you have lessons. And you could combine lessons with time on the driving range before or after the round of golf your friends are playing. Or a friend could spend an hour at the range while you have a lesson before you get back together on the range before eventually retiring to the clubhouse.

12. Don’t Think the Place You Play Matters

Another mistake people make is mistaking the place for the quality of the game. For example, they think they have to play at an elite club to become a good player. Don’t fight to play at a top club out of the mistaken belief that you’ll magically learn more and faster at the elite club. You’ll do better taking more lessons at a cheaper club and practicing at the range than standing 500 feet from a professional player. Don’t sign up for a country club or two thinking that if you have invested a fortune into the membership, you’ll feel guilty enough to play many rounds of golf and become better.

Lots of people have expensive exercise equipment sitting unused in the corner of their bedrooms or living rooms that they bought out of the same delusion, that if they spent a fortune on the equipment, it would entice them (or guilt-trip the) into using it until they had the body they dreamed of having.

So be comfortable playing at the driving range, improving your game, instead of thinking that playing at a top club will make a difference. There is no hit to your pride to practice at the practice range, and realistically, the practice range at the top clubs is not five times better though it may cost five times as much. And don’t worry about what anyone else thinks on the range – they’re focused on their own game. And yes, they’re trying to improve their game, too, so they aren’t going to be judging you.

If you’ve learned the basics to play the game and you’re ready to move up from the driving range, invite your friends to a par 3 golf course. You’ll enjoy the game more if you’re on a simpler course. You won’t spend as much time hunting for balls or hacking away at a sand trap.

13. Learn How to Read the Green

You need to know how to read breaks and adjust your shot to accommodate them if you want to keep your score down. And practice getting balls out of these conditions before you start playing the harder courses where one ball in the sand trap adds ten points to your score.

14. Understand the Impact of Time on Your Game and Performance

Golfing has long been considered an excellent networking opportunity because it takes about four hours to play a full round of golf (18 holes). And that time frame has been confirmed by studies of various golf courses. The only exception is par 3 golf courses. The average golf course hole takes 15 minutes to play, while a par 3 is more like 10 minutes. So a par 3 course will take more like 3 hours to play over 4 hours.

If you don’t have that much time, consider a 9 hole course to cut it down to two hours. It is possible in some courses to play just 6 holes. If you have a strict schedule, instead of harassing other players to hurry up, you could spend an hour or two at the driving range.
Note that you can save time by riding a golf cart between holes. This may shave an hour off your game.

However, you need to realize that the game is slowed down by every addition of a player to your group, and the game is slowed down even more by the addition of beginners. If you’re a beginner, tell others in the group you’re new to the game. They may choose to break up the group so that beginners can play at their own pace while the more advanced players can move through faster.

You can also save everyone time by having a number of cheap balls. If you’re emotionally invested in your expensive balls, you’ll waste time hunting for them, slowing everyone down. Be honest, too. You’re not going to play 20% better if you have premium golf balls. You could save time and hassle if you’re willing to buy used balls at the golf course if you’ve lost too many of the ones you brought.

15. Analyze Your Stats

If you use a device to record your stats or tap into software that does the same, it could analyze your statistics and give you feedback that isn’t obvious to someone watching a single round of golf. Are you more accurate with a particular club? Do you miss more often when you approach from the left? Are you not hitting enough into the green? Do you have horrible stats with that titanium club you bought? How badly are you missing with your putter? Now you know what to practice or take lessons to improve.

Conclusion

Golf is a challenging sport for those who are in the midst of it. Follow these tips, and you’ll see your performance dramatically improve in no time.

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